Trenton Doyle Hancock

  • From 548 First St NE. Screenprint on Sunray Satin.
    From 548 First St NE. Screenprint on Sunray Satin.
  • From 548 First St NE. Etching, relief, silkscreen, and collage on Magnani Pescia.
    From 548 First St NE. Etching, relief, silkscreen, and collage on Magnani Pescia.
  • From 548 First St NE. Silkscreen and pigment print on Sunray Satin.
    From 548 First St NE. Silkscreen and pigment print on Sunray Satin.
  • From 548 First St NE. Silkscreen and pigment print on Sunray Satin.
    From 548 First St NE. Silkscreen and pigment print on Sunray Satin.
  • From 548 First St NE. Screenprint on Sunray Satin.
    From 548 First St NE. Screenprint on Sunray Satin.
  • From 548 First St NE. Photogravure with stenciled flat on Sunray Satin.
    From 548 First St NE. Photogravure with stenciled flat on Sunray Satin.
548 First St NE (16 prints by Trenton Doyle Hancock), published in 2013. Each print is 24"x19" with an edition size of 14, housed, with a title page, in a custom-made, linen-covered clamshell box with title page.

This is an autobiographical and visually explosive portfolio based on childhood memories in Hancock's grandmother's house. The prints utilize many processes including silkscreen, photogravure, lithography, and etching.

View studio photos from Hancock's residency

Trenton Doyle Hancock visited Island Press in spring 2012 as the Arthur L. and Sheila Prensky Visiting Artist. Using memories and motifs from his childhood, Hancock created a portfolio of 16 prints entitled 548 First St. N.E., the street address of his grandmother's home in Paris, Texas, as well as the singular print DNA Footprint.

Hancock lives and works in Houston, where he was a 2002 Core Artist in Residence at the Glassell School of Art of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. He was featured in the 2000 and 2002 Whitney Biennial exhibitions, becoming one of the youngest artists in history to participate in this prestigious survey. His work has been the subject of one-person exhibitions at the University of South Florida, Tampa; Savannah College of Art and Design; Contemporary Arts Museum Houston; the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami. Hancock's prints, drawings, and collaged felt paintings work together to tell the story of the Mounds—a group of mythical creatures that are the tragic protagonists of the artist’s unfolding narrative.