Leah Beeferman

  • Force 1 (Float), 2018. Collagraph and archival inkjet with chine collé. 32 ¼ x 19 1/8 in. Edition size 10.
    Force 1 (Float), 2018. Collagraph and archival inkjet with chine collé. 32 ¼ x 19 1/8 in. Edition size 10.
  • Force 2 (Flow), 2018. Collagraph and archival inkjet with chine collé. 32 ¼ x 19 1/8 in. Edition size 10.
    Force 2 (Flow), 2018. Collagraph and archival inkjet with chine collé. 32 ¼ x 19 1/8 in. Edition size 10.

Leah Beeferman is a New York City-based artist working with digital drawing, video, and sound. Her work creates relationships between the physical, natural world and the immateriality of digital and experiential space. She earned a BA from Brown University and an MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University, and has participated in numerous residencies, including LMCC Workspace (New York), The Arctic Circle (Svalbard), SIM (Reykjavik), Experimental Sound Studio (Chicago), Sirius (Ireland), Kökarkultur (Finland), and Diapason (New York). In 2015 she had a solo show, Strong Force, at Rawson Projects in New York. In 2016-17, she traveled to Finland on a Fulbright Scholar Award. She co-runs Parallelograms, an ongoing online artist project.

As the inaugural Island Press Emerging Artist Fellow in summer 2016, Beeferman's original idea was to see how—or if—the material processes of printmaking could translate the quality of immateriality typically present in her digital work. We thought about a few things as starting points: picking colors that could print very solid and deep, despite simply going down flat; playing with the idea of the print surface, and how to make the flat shapes feel like they were suspended in a space deeper than the paper; and working with digitallyvprinted forms alongside stenciled or print-made forms to play with what is material, what is done by hand, and what is mechanical. The blues are inks mixed to match Pantone colors similar to what Beeferman normally uses on the computer (RGB 0, 0, 255), and the yellow is a nod to CMYK (process yellow). The three digital images are 1) drawn in Photoshop 2) scanned aluminum foil 3) taken from a video still of a volcano eruption, and colorshifted. They add to the question of what is material and what is digital, as they all are both material and digital, in varying degrees.